British Steel and Infrabel sign contract

Egypt’s Green Line turns to British Steel

Image: British Steel.

Rails for a major project in North Africa will run all the way from the north of Lincolnshire in England. A new mixed traffic route, connecting the Red Sea coast with the Mediterranean, will run on rails supplied from the slightly less sunny Scunthorpe in England. The manufacturer British Steel has won what it calls a major rail contract to supply Egypt’s new railway development.

From Scunthorpe to the Sahara. British Steel has won a multi-million-pound contract to supply rail for a landmark new route in North Africa. In total, 9,500 tonnes of track, produced in Scunthorpe, in the North of England, will be delivered for Egypt’s Green Line railway. It will be part of that country’s first fully electrified mainline.

A number of key suppliers

When completed, Egypt’s new railway network will be 660km long and will carry mixed traffic. Passenger trains are expected to run at up to a maximum speed of 250kph. British Steel is among several key suppliers providing rail to the project. The manufacturer is supplying high-quality rail (technically 60E1 in grade R260) in 18-metre lengths.

Desert rails. Egypt plans to catapult its railway network into the future, and a proportion of that will be on British Steel rails. Image: © Siemens Mobility.

“We are delighted British Steel has been awarded this contract”, said Jérôme Bonef, British Steel Commercial Manager Export – Rail. “Such a transformational project for Egypt will bring significant improvements to the transport network. The British Steel rail business prides itself on providing value solutions to our customers, being easy to trade with whilst providing on-time deliveries with world-leading quality.”

Ambitious plans

The line is part of a radical upgrade of the railway network in Egypt. Backers say the construction of a high-speed network will reduce primary energy usage and overall air pollution. The project is being managed by Orascom Construction and Arab Contractors Joint Venture, with the design, construction, commissioning, and operation of the line handled by the National Authority for Tunnels (NAT) for Egypt. The country recently ordered new rolling stock as part of overall upgrade plans.

Egypt has ambitious plans for rail. Image: WikimediaCommons. © Abs616.

Two rail shipments will be transported from British Steel to the north Egyptian port of Alexandria, the second of which is scheduled to be shipped in June. The rail will be used to extend the line from Alexandria via El Alamein to the Mediterranean coast in the northwest and eastwards to the Gulf of Suez and the Red Sea. Ironically, to reach the embarking port of Immingham, the rails will be moved by road.

Egyptian Railways were recently introduced to British TV audiences in some detail. A four-part production of “Ancient Egypt by Train” featured a series of journeys hosted by the presenter and popular historian Alice Roberts.

Author: Simon Walton

Simon Walton is UK correspondent for RailTech.com and Railfreight.com

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Egypt’s Green Line turns to British Steel | RailTech.com
British Steel and Infrabel sign contract

Egypt’s Green Line turns to British Steel

Image: British Steel.

Rails for a major project in North Africa will run all the way from the north of Lincolnshire in England. A new mixed traffic route, connecting the Red Sea coast with the Mediterranean, will run on rails supplied from the slightly less sunny Scunthorpe in England. The manufacturer British Steel has won what it calls a major rail contract to supply Egypt’s new railway development.

From Scunthorpe to the Sahara. British Steel has won a multi-million-pound contract to supply rail for a landmark new route in North Africa. In total, 9,500 tonnes of track, produced in Scunthorpe, in the North of England, will be delivered for Egypt’s Green Line railway. It will be part of that country’s first fully electrified mainline.

A number of key suppliers

When completed, Egypt’s new railway network will be 660km long and will carry mixed traffic. Passenger trains are expected to run at up to a maximum speed of 250kph. British Steel is among several key suppliers providing rail to the project. The manufacturer is supplying high-quality rail (technically 60E1 in grade R260) in 18-metre lengths.

Desert rails. Egypt plans to catapult its railway network into the future, and a proportion of that will be on British Steel rails. Image: © Siemens Mobility.

“We are delighted British Steel has been awarded this contract”, said Jérôme Bonef, British Steel Commercial Manager Export – Rail. “Such a transformational project for Egypt will bring significant improvements to the transport network. The British Steel rail business prides itself on providing value solutions to our customers, being easy to trade with whilst providing on-time deliveries with world-leading quality.”

Ambitious plans

The line is part of a radical upgrade of the railway network in Egypt. Backers say the construction of a high-speed network will reduce primary energy usage and overall air pollution. The project is being managed by Orascom Construction and Arab Contractors Joint Venture, with the design, construction, commissioning, and operation of the line handled by the National Authority for Tunnels (NAT) for Egypt. The country recently ordered new rolling stock as part of overall upgrade plans.

Egypt has ambitious plans for rail. Image: WikimediaCommons. © Abs616.

Two rail shipments will be transported from British Steel to the north Egyptian port of Alexandria, the second of which is scheduled to be shipped in June. The rail will be used to extend the line from Alexandria via El Alamein to the Mediterranean coast in the northwest and eastwards to the Gulf of Suez and the Red Sea. Ironically, to reach the embarking port of Immingham, the rails will be moved by road.

Egyptian Railways were recently introduced to British TV audiences in some detail. A four-part production of “Ancient Egypt by Train” featured a series of journeys hosted by the presenter and popular historian Alice Roberts.

Author: Simon Walton

Simon Walton is UK correspondent for RailTech.com and Railfreight.com

Add your comment

characters remaining.

Log in through one of the following social media partners to comment.